August 1, 2018

POSTED BY

Celeste Hylton-James

CATEGORY

Illustrators to Watch: Gaurab Thakali

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These days, I find that jazz is an acquired taste. Despite a jazz musician’s mastery and the genre’s clear influence on contemporary music, this genre hasn’t resonated well with millennials. Where a moody bass and slick rhymes reign the radio, jazz has found a comfortable spot in the back of …

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These days, I find that jazz is an acquired taste. Despite a jazz musician’s mastery and the genre’s clear influence on contemporary music, this genre hasn’t resonated well with millennials. Where a moody bass and slick rhymes reign the radio, jazz has found a comfortable spot in the back of the class. Why? It just sounds too classic.

But is classic a bad thing? Nepalese illustrator Gaurab Thakali embraces this concept. Retrospective, vibrant and familiar, his work evokes the energy that jazz has been shackled by in the past, breathing life into a new era of visuals for jazz musicians. If you look closely, not only is his work inspired by vintage album covers, its composition is often derived from ukiyo-e, Japanese woodblock paintings. I love the way he uses his signature color palette, especially in Oscar Jerome’s self-titled EP shown below. It looks like a vintage sleeve you can find in an underground record shop, but so much more.

While many of his clients are musicians, he has created work for a myriad of publications and notable figures like the New Yorker and Hannibal Buress. Regardless of what underground urban scene he illustrates, it’s difficult to resist the intoxicating vibes behind his portfolio.

Follow his work on IG and purchase prints here, so you’ll never miss a beat.

Just got the vinyl off @oscjerome available at ????oscarjerome.bandcamp.com ????

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Artwork for the main mane @hannibalburess

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