July 12, 2019

POSTED BY

Jose Fresan

CATEGORY

Panorama of the City of New York

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One of the biggest remnants of the World Fair of 1964 still lives in the Queens Museum. The Panorama of the City of New York, is the world’s largest architectural model. It is a 9,335-square-foot built-to-scale recreation of the 5 boroughs of New York City. It was built specially for …

new york branding sports graphic design studio

One of the biggest remnants of the World Fair of 1964 still lives in the Queens Museum. The Panorama of the City of New York, is the world’s largest architectural model. It is a 9,335-square-foot built-to-scale recreation of the 5 boroughs of New York City.

It was built specially for the 1964 World’s Fair, that took place in Flushing Meadows. The Panorama was built by a team of more than 100 people for model makers Raymond Lester & Associates over the course of three years.

The model has been updated in 1967, 1968, 1969 and 1974. With it’s biggest update happening in 1992. However it’s nearly impossible to keep track with the ever changing look of New York City.

Looking at the panorama is such a breathtaking experience. Getting to see the city in this way it’s a unique experience, you can go from Battery Park to Harlem in 40 steps. The level of detail and accuracy is extraordinary. And even if the panorama is not up to date, I bet you can find your building, unless you live on one of the new glassy Williamsburg or Hudson Yards Towers.

The Museum has launched the campaign Adopt-A-Building, in order to keep the Panorama in its best shape. You can adopt a building by as little as $100. It’s a beautiful way of pretending you actually own your loved apartment in NYC and it’s helping the museum keep the Panorama alive.

So Adopt-A-Building now! or visit the Queens Museum and take a look at this awesome model.

new york branding sports graphic design studio

new york branding sports graphic design studio
© 2013 Scott Rudd
new york branding sports graphic design studio
(Photo by Gary Gershoff/Getty Images for Amazon Studios)

All images courtesy of the Queen Museum