February 12, 2020

POSTED BY

Jose Fresan

CATEGORY

Snickers’s Save-The-World Super Bowl Ad

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Last week the biggest yearly advertising event, The Super Bowl, aired for the entire world. And once again it brought millions of dollars of spending in the “best” creative work of the world’s top advertising agencies. Yes, sorry to break it to you, it was never about Football. The average …

Last week the biggest yearly advertising event, The Super Bowl, aired for the entire world. And once again it brought millions of dollars of spending in the “best” creative work of the world’s top advertising agencies. Yes, sorry to break it to you, it was never about Football. The average 30-second TV spot for the Super Bowl was sold at $5.6 million in 2020, not including of course the strategic, creative and production work behind every ad.

These 30 seconds provide brands with a chance to reach millions of people at once. They have half a minute to make a case on why they are the best choice in the market. This time Snicker’s decided to use it’s 30 seconds and millions of dollars by cracking a “joke” at the world and the brands that pretend to care about it.

You can watch the Ad by BBDO New York here:

So now that you’ve watched the ad, how do you feel about it? To be honest at first I laughed, it’s funny right? They’re taking on Coca-Cola and all those hypocrite brands that claim to be making the world a little better when they actually couldn’t care less about it. It’s definitely current, and they’re tackling “first world problems” in a funny way, because yeah those are real problems.

At least it’s honest, but coming from a global company that makes $35 billion in yearly sales, and operates in an industry riddled with environmental, sustainability, and child-labor issues, it surely leaves you with a weird feeling after the first laugh. Are we being laughed at that cynically? Are brands finally accepting that they don’t really care about the world? Are they openly laughing at how they manipulate the will of the people for profit?

I shouldn’t even be writing this post; it probably counts as earned media in their communication strategy; and yeah, this whole “controversy” was engineered to create outrage and position the brand as “disruptive” and “honest”, but it only speaks of the confidence brands have at their influence over us. They can laugh at how they play with us and not lose $1 of profit. Maybe I’m being too sensitive, but the state that corporations have brought our world to cuts my laughter short at this clearly “witty” ad.