September 7, 2020

POSTED BY

Sirui Liao

CATEGORY

Image of Public Restroom: Project Tokyo Toilet

Tokyo Toilet Tokyo Toilet What do you think of public restrooms? I believe that most people wouldn’t go with public restrooms unless they have no choice. To break people’s stereotype towards public restrooms, the Japanese non-profit group The Nippon Foundation invited over 16 famous designers to create inviting public restrooms, …

Tokyo Toilet
Tokyo Toilet

What do you think of public restrooms? I believe that most people wouldn’t go with public restrooms unless they have no choice. To break people’s stereotype towards public restrooms, the Japanese non-profit group The Nippon Foundation invited over 16 famous designers to create inviting public restrooms, and they name it Tokyo Toilet.

Shigeru Ban
Shigeru Ban
Shigeru Ban
Shigeru Ban
Shigeru Ban

Architect Shigeru Ban designed two transparent public restrooms in the Yoyogi Fukamachi Mini Park and Haru-no-Ogawa Community Park. These two public restrooms directly communicate their sanitary condition and occupation with visitors by transparent walls. Once the door is locked, the glass wall would automatically turn non-transparent. And after 30 minutes, the door would automatically unlock the door. The colorful light of these two public restrooms added more liveness to the park at night and made people feel more secure to use.

 

Nao Tamura
Nao Tamura
Nao Tamura

Designer Nao Tamura created a bright red public restroom near a bus station at Higashi Sanchome. She was inspired by the Origata, a Japanese traditional gift-wrapping method, and created three private and individual spaces.

 

 

Masamichi Katayama
Masamichi Katayama
Masamichi Katayama

Designer Masamichi Katayama and his design company Wonderwall created Modern Kawaya inside the Ebisu park. Kawaya is a toilet form in the Neolithic period of Japan. The designer connects 15 concrete walls in different directions, therefore created a playful, mazelike, yet modern retro public restroom.

 

 

Fumihiko Maki
Fumihiko Maki
Fumihiko Maki

Architect Fumihiko Maki’s design is located at the Ebisu East Park. This public restroom gives out greenie forest feeling. The red octopus installation is very popular among the kids, so people also call it the octopus park.
When designing the restroom, Fumihiko wants it to be more than just a restroom, but a place for kids and workers to rest a little. The wavey roof of this public restroom also made it feel like a light summer breeze.