• 247 Centre Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10013 |
  • +1 212 629 9550|
  • Behance
  • Vimeo
  • YouTube
  • Pinterest
  • Instagram
  • LinkedIn

Rediscovering the Persona “Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern”

new york branding sports graphic design agency

Left: Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). Black Pansy & Forget-Me-Nots (Pansy), 1926. Oil on canvas, 27 1/8x 12 1/4 in. (68.9 x 31.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Gift of Mrs. Alfred S. Rossin, 28.521. @ Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. (Photo: Christine Gant, Brooklyn Museum)
Right: Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). Blue #2, 1916. Watercolor on paper, 15 7/8 x 11 in. (40.3 x 27.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Bequest of Mary T. Cockcroft, by exchange, 58.74. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. (Photo: Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum)

Last weekend, I went to see the “Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern” exhibition at The Brooklyn Museum of Art. I expected to see her magnificent flower paintings, but instead, I learned more about Georgia O’Keeffe, the persona. O’Keeffe crafted her signature public image through her clothing and the way she posed for the camera. Married to renown photographer Alfred Stieglitz, the show presents a collection of portraits ranging from the intimate to the iconic. In addition to Stieglitz portraits, the exhibition presents photographs of O’Keeffe and her homes by other famous photographers such as Ansel Adams, Annie Leibovitz, Philippe Halsman, Yousuf Karsh, Cecil Beaton, Andy Warhol, Bruce Weber, Todd Webb, and others.

I learned also that there has been a general misconception about her flower paintings. Most people—including myself—believe they have to do with eroticism and woman sexuality. I learned that she began painting flowers as a response to the rapid urban development of New York City and how flowers were being replaced with buildings. She decided to paint monumental flowers so people will see them as big and as powerful as pieces of architecture.

O’Keeffe, who lived almost 100 years, became nearly blind during the last years of her life. Nevertheless, she kept on painting. “Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern” shows some of the last paintings O’Keeffe made. They are monochromatic fluid, simple abstractions. Ironically, they are reminiscent of the very early work shown in her first-ever museum exhibition, which was held at the Brooklyn Museum in 1927. She started in abstraction and returned to abstraction going full circle.

Georgia O’Keeffe was a revolutionary artist. Her art, clothes, subject matter and the way she looked at the camera made her immortal. Check out “Living Modern” and discover for yourself what makes Georgia O’Keeffe into one of our most treasured American Icons.

“Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern” is part of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

“Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern”
March 3–July 23, 2017
The Brooklyn Museum of Art
Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th Floor

new york branding sports graphic design agency

Alfred Stieglitz (American, 1864-1946). Georgia O’Keefe, A Portrait, 1918. Gelatin silver print, 4.75×3.625 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art

new york branding sports graphic design agency

Ansel Adams (American, 1902-1984). Georgia O’Keeffe, Carmel Highlands, California, 1981. Gelatin silver print, 10 1/8 x 13 1/8 in. (25.7 x 33.3 cm). Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M.; Gift of Juan and Anna Marie Hamilton, 2003.03.08. © 2016 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust

new york branding sports graphic design agency

Alfred Stieglitz (American, 1864-1946). Georgia O’Keefe, circa 1920-22. Gelatin silver print, 4.5×3.5 inches. ©Georgia O’Keefe Museum

(left) Emsley. suit (jacket, pants, and vest), 1983. Black wool. Inner garment: Lord & Taylor. Shirt, circa 1960s. White cotton. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. (right)Wrap Dress, circa 1960s–70s. Black cotton. Inner garment: Carol Sarkisian (American 1936-2013). Wrap dress, circa 1970s. White cotton. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M. (photo: © Gavin Ashworth)

(left) Emsley. suit (jacket, pants, and vest), 1983. Black wool. Inner garment: Lord & Taylor. Shirt, circa 1960s. White cotton. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. (right)Wrap Dress, circa 1960s–70s. Black cotton. Inner garment: Carol Sarkisian (American 1936-2013). Wrap dress, circa 1970s. White cotton. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M. (photo: © Gavin Ashworth)

new york branding sports graphic design agency

Left: Padded Kimono (Tanzen), circa 1960s–70s. Silk with woven black and gray stripe. Inner garment: Kimono. White linen (?). Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M.; Gift of Juan and Anna Marie Hamilton, 2000.03.0359 and 2000.03.0404. (Photo: © Gavin Ashworth)
Right: Attributed to Georgia O’Keeffe. Dress with Matching Belt, circa 1930s. Black wool, crepe and white silk. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M.; Gift of Juan and Anna Marie Hamilton, 2000.3.355a-b. (Photo: © Gavin Ashworth)

new york branding sports graphic design agency

Pelvis II, 1944 – Georgia O’Keeffe

0
May 18, 2017
POSTED BY
CATEGORY
Fine Arts
Happenings

Leave a Comment