July 25, 2014

POSTED BY

Rafael Esquer

CATEGORY

Above and Beyond the Visual: Pedro Varela’s Worlds

new york branding sports graphic design company

Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 200 cm. detail, 2011 When I first saw the paintings of Brazilian artist Pedro Varela I was immediately hooked. They brought me to worlds beyond the realm of painting and imagery; they transported me to worlds that seem to have been created in text …

new york branding sports graphic design company
Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 200 cm. detail, 2011

When I first saw the paintings of Brazilian artist Pedro Varela I was immediately hooked. They brought me to worlds beyond the realm of painting and imagery; they transported me to worlds that seem to have been created in text by García Márquez, Borges, Calvino , Saramago, or some other of my favorite writers.

I was not surprised when I read his bio, The cities Pedro Varela draws are far more connected to literature than to any reference in the visual arts. As if waiting for a text by Borges to accompany them, they reserve large blank spaces on the paper. They could also be mirages seen from afar by a character of A Thousand and One Nights, cities with female names like those by Italo Calvino, or castles from a tale we keep from the infancy of our experience in literature.

The accomplished young artist works in painting, sculpture and mixed media. For today’s post, I selected his ‘blue’ paintings. I hope you enjoy them and, as they did for me, that they transport you to domains above and beyond the visual.

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company

new york branding sports graphic design company
Chica Chica Boom Chic, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 200 cm, 2012

All images ©Pedro Varela

Leave a Reply