November 5, 2016

POSTED BY

Dana Chou

CATEGORY

Eye Tricks and Escher

new york branding sports graphic design company

Recently in my psychology class, we discussed the human eye and it’s ability to fool our brain into perceiving what we think we see. A pretty conspicuous example of this phenomenon are optical illusions, which are visual stimuli that are perceived by the eyes and then comprehended by the brain …

Recently in my psychology class, we discussed the human eye and it’s ability to fool our brain into perceiving what we think we see. A pretty conspicuous example of this phenomenon are optical illusions, which are visual stimuli that are perceived by the eyes and then comprehended by the brain in a way that is different from reality.

Optical illusions become so much more fascinating once you realize just how much activity is actually going on in your brain when you’re attempting to process seemingly impossible visuals. Upon seeing images of optical illusions and impossible shapes, I was immediately reminded of the works of world-famous Dutch artist Maurits Cornelis Escher – also known as M.C. Escher.

Escher is known for his mathematically inspired lithographs, woodworks, and mezzotints. He is most famous for his “impossible constructions,” as well as his extraordinarily advanced visualizations of mathematical principles.

new york branding sports graphic design company
“Ascending and Descending” (1960 – Lithograph)
new york branding sports graphic design company
“Belvedere” (1958 -Lithograph)
new york branding sports graphic design company
“Waterfall” (1961 – Lithograph)
new york branding sports graphic design company
“Concave and Convex” (1955 – Lithograph)
new york branding sports graphic design company
“Up and Down” (1947 – Lithograph)
new york branding sports graphic design company
“Relativity” (1953 – Lithograph)

What’s so enticing about Escher’s works is the fact that your brain needs to do a double take in order to attempt to understand the possibility of the impossible. The intricate details pull your eyes in all different directions simultaneously, and you can’t help but wonder how Escher was able to create such meticulous and complex puzzles.

The fact is that our brains can’t naturally take in these illusions at first glance. It requires a second look – maybe a third, a fourth, or even a fifth. But, like with any kind of art, that’s probably what the artist wanted you to do.

See more oddities here.

Leave a Reply